More than 320 people killed in southern storms - WKOW 27: Madison, WI Breaking News, Weather and Sports

More than 320 people killed in southern storms

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TUSCALOOSA, Ala. (AP) -- Emergency officials have raised Alabama's death toll to 238, bringing the total number killed in seven states from devastating tornadoes to 329.

It was the deadliest day for twisters since the Great Depression.

Alabama was in the path of the most destruction from Wednesday's storms. Authorities on Friday raised the number of confirmed dead. More than 30 lost their lives in Tuscaloosa, which is home to the University of Alabama. Two students are among the dead.

Alabama Gov. Robert Bentley says 1,700 people were injured by the tornadoes.

In March 1932, 332 people died, all in Alabama.

The largest death toll ever in the U.S. from twisters was on March 18, 1925 when 747 people were killed in storms that raged through Missouri, Illinois and Indiana.

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TUSCALOOSA, Ala. (AP) -- Authorities say the death toll from the devastating tornado outbreak across the South has climbed to 318, making it the deadliest day for twisters since the Great Depression.

Alabama was in the path of the most destruction from Wednesday's storms. Authorities on Friday raised the number of confirmed dead to 228. More than 30 lost their lives in Tuscaloosa, which is home to the University of Alabama. Two students are among the dead.

In March 1932, 332 people died, all in Alabama.

In April 1974, a series of twisters killed 315 people in 11 states.

The largest death toll ever in the U.S. from twisters was on March 18, 1925 when 747 people were killed in storms that raged through Missouri, Illinois and Indiana. In that outbreak, a single, 219-mile-long tornado killed 695 people.

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PLEASANT GROVE, Ala. (AP) -- Alabama Gov. Robert Bentley says his state has confirmed 204 deaths from the tornadoes that hit Alabama yesterday.

That bring the death toll in the region to at least 290. There were 33 deaths in Mississippi, 33 in Tennessee, 14 in Georgia, five in Virginia and one in Kentucky. Hundreds if not thousands of people were injured -- nearly 800 in Tuscaloosa alone.

A tornado expert is offering more details of the destructive force carried by the tornadoes. The expert at the National Weather Service's Storm Prediction Center in Oklahoma says some of the tornadoes were as wide as a mile, and likely packed a wallop that only 1 in 100 twisters ever bring.

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PLEASANT GROVE, Ala. (AP) -- A spokeswoman for Alabama's governor says storms that devastated the South left 180 people dead in that state, bringing the total death toll in the region to 266.

Leah Garner, the deputy press secretary for Gov. Robert Bentley, said Thursday that the death toll in Alabama had climbed to 180. The storms that spawned dozens of tornadoes were part of the deadliest storm outbreak in decades. There were also deaths reported in five other states: 33 in Mississippi; 33 in Tennessee; 14 in Georgia; five in Virginia; and one in Kentucky.

A tornado expert is offering more details of the destructive force carried by the tornadoes. The expert at the National Weather Service's Storm Prediction Center in Oklahoma says some of the tornadoes were as wide as a mile, and likely packed a wallop that only 1 in 100 twisters ever bring.

People in hard-hit areas in Alabama and other states have been looking at what's left of their obliterated homes today. Nearby streets are filled with debris.

The mayor of Tuscaloosa, Ala., who flew over the area this morning, says some neighborhoods were "basically removed from the map."

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PLEASANT GROVE, Ala. (AP) -- A tornado expert is offering more details of the destructive force carried by the tornadoes that left at least 251 people dead in a half dozen southern states.

The expert at the National Weather Service's Storm Prediction Center in Oklahoma says some of the tornadoes were as wide as a mile, and likely packed a wallop that only 1 in 100 twisters ever bring.

People in hard-hit areas in Alabama and other states have been looking at what's left of their obliterated homes today. Nearby streets are filled with debris.

The mayor of Tuscaloosa, Ala., who flew over the area this morning, says some neighborhoods were "basically removed from the map." The city's emergency management building was destroyed. Authorities are using a stadium at the University of Alabama as a command post.

The school has canceled final exams and postponed commencement from May until August

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BIRMINGHAM, Ala. (AP) -- A wave of severe storms laced with tornadoes have battered the South, killing nearly 200 people in five states.

Sixty-one people were killed in Alabama alone Wednesday, but officials fear that number could increase. One of the hardest-hit areas was Tuscaloosa, where a tornado barreled through the city, killing at least 15 people. The storm left debris in the streets and businesses unrecognizable. Students at the University of Alabama used flashlights to check out the damage.

About 1,400 National Guard soldiers are being deployed around the state.

The storm system also caused deaths in Mississippi, Georgia, Tennessee and Virginia.

News footage showed paramedics lifting a child out of a flattened home, with many neighboring buildings in the city of more than 83,000 also reduced to rubble.

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