Eating Out When You Have Diabetes - WKOW 27: Madison, WI Breaking News, Weather and Sports

Eating Out When You Have Diabetes


Web MD -- Tips to Lower Salt Intake When Dining Out

Eating less salt can substantially reduce the risk of health problems associated with high blood pressure, which is a risk factor for heart disease and stroke -- a cause of death for more than 2 out of every 3 people with diabetes

The 2005 dietary food guidelines suggest decreasing daily salt intake to about a teaspoon a day. Here are some guidelines to follow to help you keep your salt (sodium) intake down when eating out:


  • Select fresh fruit or vegetables.
  • Avoid soups and broths.
  • Stay away from bread and rolls with salty, buttery crusts.


  • Select fresh fruits and vegetables.
  • Avoid pickles, canned or marinated vegetables, cured meats, seasoned croutons, cheeses, salted seeds.
  • Order salad dressings on the side and use small amounts of them.

Main courses

  • Select plain foods including broiled, grilled, or roasted meat, poultry, fish, or shellfish.
  • Select plain vegetables, potatoes, and noodles.
  • Ask the server about the low-salt menu choices and ask how the food is prepared.
  • Request food to be cooked without salt or monosodium glutamate (MSG).
  • Avoid restaurants that do not allow for special food preparation (such as buffet-style restaurants or diners).
  • Avoid casseroles, mixed dishes, gravies, and sauces.
  • At fast food restaurants, skip the special sauces, condiments, and cheese.
  • Avoid salted condiments and garnishes such as olives and pickles.


  • Select fresh fruits, ices, sherbet, gelatin, and plain cakes

Controlling Portion Sizes at Restaurants:

Servings at many restaurants are often big enough to provide lunch for two days. When eating out:

  • Ask for half or smaller portions.
  • Eyeball your appropriate portion, set the rest aside, and ask for a doggie bag right away.
  • If you have dessert, share.
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