Lawsuit filed in limo crash that killed Monona woman - WKOW 27: Madison, WI Breaking News, Weather and Sports

Lawsuit filed in limo crash that killed Monona woman

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CHICAGO (WKOW) -- Two victims of a March limousine crash in Chicago that killed a Monona woman have filed a lawsuit.

Attorney Timothy J. Cavanaugh says he represents victims Robert Rosa and his partner of more than 20 years, Michael Johnson. Both were injured in the crash, but Cavanaugh says Rosa has more serious injuries. He described Rosa's condition as touch and go over the weekend, adding that the man has spinal cord injuries could affect him through the course of his life.

"The filing of this lawsuit is the first step in determining all the factors that contributed to the devastating crash in a dangerous construction zone," said Cavanaugh.

The attorney has filed a motion seeking to secure evidence from the limousine and the limousine company.

Lyons Limousine operates out of Edgerton. Aaron Nash, 20, was driving a group of six people from Madison to O'Hare Airport in Chicago when the limousine flipped over on Interstate 90. The crash killed Terri Schmidt, 53, of Monona. Nash told police he lost control when he was blinded by the morning sun, and he could not see the traffic pattern in the construction zone and hit a concrete divider.

Tuesday, the U.S. Department of Transportation shut down Lyons Limo because the "carrier posed an imminent threat to public safety," citing multiple safety violations like repeatedly using underaged drivers with poor driving records. Cavanaugh found the order somewhat stunning.

"I haven't seen an order like this within two weeks of a crash in my 30 years practicing law," he said.

WKOW has tried multiple times to contact the owner of Lyons Limousine for comment.-

In addition to Lyons, the attorney mentioned Zenith Limousine. Zenith claims it no longer has a business agreement with Lyons, but Cavanaugh says a Zenith placard was on the limousine that crashed and he wants to get more information about any possible connection.

Cavanaugh says he is also looking into whether the construction company and owner of the section of the road where the crash occurred might deserve some blame in what happened.

 

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