Skip to main content
You are the owner of this article.
You have permission to edit this article.
Edit

Alliant Energy to build 6 new solar projects, enough to power 100,000 Wisconsin homes

  • Updated
  • 0
Solar Panel

MADISON (WKOW) — Alliant Energy is set to begin construction on six new solar projects that will provide 414 megawatts (MW) of energy, which can power an estimated 100,000 Wisconsin homes.

This is part of Alliant Energy's Clean Energy Blueprint that will add nearly 1,100 MW of solar energy generation to Wisconsin’s energy grid.

“At Alliant Energy, we’re driven by our commitment to serve customers and build stronger communities,” said David de Leon, president of Alliant Energy's Wisconsin energy company. “We are excited to break ground and begin construction on these solar projects as we accelerate toward a cleaner energy future. We expect our solar development plans to create hundreds of new construction jobs and deliver safe, reliable, affordable energy for years to come.”

The company expects to begin construction this summer and finish late 2023. They will contract with Burns & McDonnell and use craft labor from several local union halls.

“We appreciate Alliant Energy’s prioritization of local unionized labor on renewable energy projects,” said Emily Pritzkow, executive director of the Wisconsin Building Trades Council. “Alliant Energy understands the benefits of hiring local labor, the development of a strong workforce through apprenticeships and training, and the ripple effect it has on our local economies, and state as a whole. When businesses partner with the skilled forces of Wisconsin’s unionized building trades, they know they’re going to get a safe, quality product that delivers superior value for everyone.”

Based on what is outlined in its Clean Energy Blueprint, Alliant Energy’s says its 12 utility scale projects will create more than 2,000 local construction jobs, provide an estimated $130 million in local tax revenues over the next 30 years and help customers avoid more than $1.6 billion in long-term costs.