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Bill Clinton has been released from the Southern California hospital where he had been treated for an infection. The 75-year-old former president left University of California Irvine Medical Center on Sunday morning. Officials say he was admitted to the hospital southeast of Los Angeles on Tuesday with an infection unrelated to COVID-19. They say he plans to continue his recovery at his home in Chappaqua, New York. Clinton spokesman Angel Ureña had said Saturday that Clinton would remain hospitalized one more night to receive further intravenous antibiotics. But he said all health indicators were “trending in the right direction.” An aide to the former president says Clinton had a urological infection that spread to his bloodstream. 

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Judges around the country are increasingly being asked to weigh in on the deworming drug ivermectin as a COVID-19 treatment. At least two dozen lawsuits have been filed around the U.S., many in recent weeks, by people seeking to force hospitals to give their COVID-stricken loved ones ivermectin, a drug for parasites that has been promoted by conservative commentators as a treatment despite a lack of evidence that it helps people with the virus. There’s been a mix of results in state courts. Some judges have refused to order hospitals to give ivermectin. Others have ordered medical providers to give the medication, despite concerns it could be harmful.

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U.S. health officials are setting the stage for a national COVID-19 vaccination campaign for younger children, inviting state officials to pre-order doses starting next week. In meetings scheduled in the next three weeks, federal officials plan to discuss making shots made by one manufacturer, Pfizer, available for kids ages 5 to 11. To help states and cities prepare, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention this week sent out a 7-page planning guide that some say provided important clarifications on how to set up the programs. 

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The U.S. Food and Drug Administration will ask its outside experts to review Merck's pill to treat COVID-19 at a meeting in late November. Regulators announced the Nov. 30 meeting on Thursday. It's a signal they will conduct a detailed review of the drug's safety and effectiveness. It also means U.S. regulators almost certainly won’t issue a decision on the drug until December. An agency officials says the FDA decided to convene the meeting to help inform its decision-making. The November date will allow agency scientists to review the application ahead of the meeting. If authorized, Merck's pill would be the first pill shown to successfully treat COVID-19.